Products of Barbados Sugar Cane

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Not only is Barbados sugar cane used to make sugar but also molasses and rum!

MOLASSES

To make molasses, Barbados sugar cane is harvested and stripped of leaves. Its juice is extracted usually by cutting, crushing or mashing. The juice is boiled to concentrate it, promoting sugar crystallization. The result of this first boiling is called first syrup, and it has the highest sugar content. First syrup is usually referred to as “cane syrup”, as opposed to molasses. Second, molasses is created from a second boiling and sugar extraction, and has a slight bitter taste. The third boiling of the sugar syrup yields blackstrap molasses, known for its robust flavour. The majority of sucrose from the original juice has been crystallised and removed. The food energy of blackstrap molasses is mostly from the small remaining sugar content. However, unlike refined sugars, it contains trace amounts of vitamins and significant amounts of several minerals. Blackstrap molasses is a source of calcium, magnesium, potassium, and iron; one tablespoon provides up to 20% of the daily value of those nutrients. Blackstrap has long been sold as a health supplement. It is used making ethyl alcohol for industry and as an ingredient in cattle feed. Cane molasses is a common ingredient in baking and cooking.

RUM

A product that is then made from molasses and is very popular in Barbados and across the world is RUM! This is done by a process of fermentation and distillation. The distillate, a clear liquid, is then usually aged in oak barrels. Rum has been produced in Barbados for over 300 years and Barbados rum is recognised as one of the best in the world today.

There are four distilleries on the island of which you can visit:

Mount Gay Rum Tour & Giftshop

With the oldest rum to be produced in the world, Mount Gay Rum is the only rum to be exported to other countries around the world. You can experience over 300 years of perfection and discover the heritage behind crafting this distinguished rum. Fascinating tours told through age-old artefacts, photo galleries, datelines, film presentations, exotic taste-testing and cocktail secrets!

Foursquare Rum Factory and Heritage Park

Foursquare Rum Distillery occupies the site of a former sugar factory that dates back to 1636. Besides the distillery, there are several attractions on the property including a sugar machinery museum, folk museum, bottling plants, and a glass fusing studio. The restored interior combines the historic structure with modern technology.

Cockspur Beach Club (formerly Malibu)

Enjoy a day at the beach and some of Barbados’ finest rum! Let the bar staff amaze you with their cocktail wizardry and perhaps enjoy a light lunch from the beachside grill. If you are interested in a little activity, join the beach attendants in some beach games, the fun never stops!

  • Tour of the West Indies Rum Distillery can be booked on the spot for USD$ 2.50 per person
  • GENERAL ADMISSION is USD$ 10 for adults and USD$5 for children 2 to 12 years old (this includes a complimentary Cockspur Rum Punch)
  • LUNCH PACKAGE is USD$ 40.00 for adults and children 2 to 12 years are 1/2 price (this includes transportation to and from your hotel, BBQ lunch, 1 complimentary Cockspur Rum Punch, and 3 additional drinks)

St. Nicholas Abbey

Located in Northern part of the island is the historic St. Nicolas Abbey. The tour includes the main house, where you can admire the architecture and historical furnishings, the steam mill and rum distillery which are now in full operation and are used to produce St. Nicholas Abbey Rum. You may purchase rum and other sugar products at the gift shop.

  • St. Nicholas Abbey is open Sunday to Friday 10:00 am to 3.30 pm
  • Admission is BB$35 Adults / BB$20 Children

Across the island you’ll see lots of colourful rum shops, stop in and have a drink or fire a shot, as we say, with the locals.

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